John Eldredge Quote

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If the narrative of the Scriptures teaches us anything, from the serpent in the Garden to the carpenter in Nazareth, it teaches us that things are rarely what they seem, that we shouldn’t be fooled by appearances.

From Proverbs 21:2:  “All deeds are right in the sight of the doer, but the Lord weighs the heart.”

Wisdom’s Guardrails

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Life’s journey fills with mistakes

Wisdom’s guardrails prevent headaches

 

Working together as a team

Life’s active, productive sunbeam

 

Be available to others

Treat everyone as brothers

 

Come prepared for each assignment

Results in flawless alignment

 

Apologize for day’s misdeeds

Forgiveness sowing fertile seeds

 

Keep secrets to self, follow scripts

Remember now, loose lips sink ships

 

Checking answers, rechecking twice

Turn over each stone, good advice

 

Patiently molding shapeless clay

Details finished, now walk away

 

Stay together, through thick ‘n thin

Tight as a fist, faithful linchpin

 

Taking charge, bold skipper steering

Encouraging words now cheering

 

Sometimes, life’s outcomes say we’re wrong

Solving mistakes, newest hit song

 

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This poem’s wisdom was gleamed from Special Agent Leroy Jethro Gibbs on the American television drama, “NCIS.”  Throughout the nearly endless episodes, Mark Harmon’s character shares his timely wisdom from “Gibbs’ Rules.”

Life Lessons (Elfchen Series #25)

Life Rewards

Character

Built slowly

Over one’s lifetime

Integrity becomes a habit

Precious

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Making It 

Life

Trekking uphill

Reaching its summit

Fulfilling journey never ends

Perseverance

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Starting Over

Discipline

Sometimes lacking

Daily excuses strike

Replace with fresh renewal

Determination

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The German-inspired poetry style of Elfchen (or Elevenie) contains five lines of poetic verse, usually without the use of rhyming verses.  A total of 11 words are used with a sequence of one, two, three, and four words before ending with a single word in the final verse.