From My Journal

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From Big Sky Buckeye

Being and active player in the game of life offers a much better place to be than sitting on the sidelines as a spectator.

Do you write a daily journal?  This inspiring thought comes from my journal, and much of what is written in my journal comes from reading and commenting on other bloggers’ posts.  Thanks to many of you for adding so much to my journal.

(Updated October 15)

Jim Rohn Quote

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Take care of your body.  It’s the only place you have to live.

From 1 Corinthians 3:16-17:  “Do you not know that you are God’s temple and that God’s Spirit dwells in you?  If anyone destroys God’s temple, God will destroy that person.  For God’s temple is holy, and you are that temple.”

Competitive Spirit

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So much of life keeps score

From elections to sports

Competitive spirit

Churns in daily reports

 

Life’s clashing resistance

Much at too high a cost

All want to be winners

Loving brothers, now lost

 

Division without love

Life without sportsmanship

Forgetting our manners

People losing their grip

 

Imagine Super Bowl

Unresolved final score

Fans calling for justice

Final outcome called for

 

Pushing aside tension

Leaving muckraker’s trough

Muting all rhetoric

Turning life’s scoreboard off

 

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Judith Wright Quotes

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Feelings and Emotions are the universal language and are to be honored.  They are the authentic expression of who you are in your deepest place.

When we are most, then we are least alone; for are these faces not identical?

Judith Wright (1915-2000) was a renowned poet, environmentalist, and champion of aboriginal rights in Australia.  She was the 1998 recipient of the Australian National Living Treasure Award.

Monday Memories: Perfection

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Perfection Defined:

The condition of being free or as free as possible from all flaws or defects.

 

Striving for absolute perfection proves to be elusive

Life provides few examples that are always conclusive

 

Perfection in bowling

Rolling 12 strikes in a row

 

Perfect school attendance

No absences during an entire school year

 

Perfect gymnastics performance

Scoring an “improbable” 10.0

 

Perfect school exam score

All questions answered correctly

 

Perfect completion of a crossword puzzle

Every square correctly filled in

 

Perfect game in baseball

Pitcher retires all batters—no one reaches first base

 

Perfect grades in school

All A’s . . .  4.0 GPA

 

Standards have been made to measure perfection

Challenging all to achieve for greater satisfaction

 

Individual actions and results to be told

Defining a level of perfection to behold

 

A “perfect” vacation

What makes it the best ever?

 

A “perfect” photograph

What makes this image so brilliant?

 

A “perfect” job

What provides the greatest satisfaction at work?

 

A “perfect” health report

What makes these results outstanding?

 

A “perfect” marriage

What moments are forever beautiful?

 

Subjective perfection is short-lived for a good reason

Definitions and expectations change with each season

 

When we think that our best efforts fall short

Allow Christ to bring us back to our home port

 

His unblemished life is perfection for sure

We follow His example for lives more pure

 

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Watchman Nee Quote

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There is nothing more tragic than to come to the end of life and know we have been on the wrong course.

From John 3:16:  “For God so loved the world that he gave His only Son, so that everyone who believes in Him may not perish but may have eternal life.”

Charles Stanley Quote

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Take a moment to ask the Lord if anything is clouding your internal signals, and trust in His promise to make your path straight.

From Proverbs 3:5-6:  “Trust in the Lord with all your heart, and do not rely on your own insight.  In all your ways acknowledge Him, and He will make straight your paths.”

Big Sky Treasures #4

Downstream from the steamboat port of Fort Benton, the currents of the Missouri River find ways to hide a mystery from the night.

Montana Territorial Secretary, Thomas Francis Meagher, has disappeared late at night outside of Fort Benton.  In the absence of the Territorial Governor, he is the acting governor.

What has happened to Meagher on this quiet evening on July 1, 1867?

Traveling by steamboat, Meagher appears to have fallen overboard.  His body is quickly swallowed up by the Missouri River’s unforgiving waters, never to be seen again.

Along the Missouri River, a steamboat waits while anchored at Fort Benton, Montana. (courtesy of Pinterest)

No one really knows what actually has happened, or better yet, they are keeping quiet about the dark happenings on this July night. 

Meagher is known to be a heavy drinker.  Is he killed in an accidental drowning when he mysteriously falls overboard?

Or did he succumb to suicide provoked by disillusionment with his shattered, personal dreams?

With many enemies, perhaps Meagher is murdered aboard this steamboat, and his body is forgotten as it conveniently floats far downstream in the swift currents of the river.

This “immortal” Irishman’s life is honored with a high degree of irony.  In an unusual tribute for a relatively unknown man with a dubious past, a statue of him is erected in 1905 and placed on the grounds in front of the State Capitol in Helena.  In the central region of the state, Meagher County is named for him.

Here are a few additional facts about Thomas Francis Meagher:

He is born in Ireland in 1823.

As an Irish nationalist, he participates in the Rebellion of 1848 and is sentenced to serve in a Tasmanian prison.  However, he escapes in 1852, and eventually ends up in the United States.

During the American Civil War, he joins the Union Army as part of the “Fighting 69th” Irish Brigade.  He rises to the rank of brigadier general.

Following the war, his dreams take him to the Montana Territory.  In his future, he hopes to build an Irish-Catholic colony and pursue a career as a U.S. Senator.

Curious Trivial Facts (10/9)

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This informative post will be posted on Saturday along with my usual writing.  We can all appreciate some of the lesser known facts from around the world.

Many of the coffee bars inside the CIA and other top-secret United States government buildings are staffed by blind people, although this has as much to do with a very successful employment drive as it does national security.

Created in England in the 1760s, the first jigsaw puzzles were maps.  Pieces were formed by cutting along the borders of the countries, and the end result was used to teach kids geography.

These facts have been discovered in I NEVER KNEW THAT by David Hoffman (2009).

Baseball Greats

Satchel Paige (1906-1982)

Don’t look back.  Something might be gaining on you.

Ted Williams (1918-2002)

No one has come up with a substitute for hard work.

Pitcher Satchel Paige played most of his years of baseball before the Major Leagues were opened up to play for African-Americans.  Despite this, he was inducted into baseball’s Hall of Fame in 1971.

Left fielder Ted Williams played his entire Major League career with the Boston Red Sox.  In 1941, he hit .406 (the person to hit at least .400).  The Hall-of-Famer’s statistics are even more incredible when one realizes that he served in the military during both World War II and the Korean War as an aviator.