Heart’s Reflections

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Looking through honest lens

Working from novel ways

Encouraging chorus

Filling every hour with praise

 

Setting aside worries

Embracing revisions

Writing life’s next chapter

Seeing tomorrow’s vision

 

Stepping forward with hope

Gazing at clouds afar

Embracing each treasure

Reaching for another star

 

Tasting sweeter moments

Moving from perfection

Pursuing unique path

Mirroring heart’s reflections

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Winston Churchill Quote

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I am an optimist.  It does not seem too much use being anything else.

From Hebrews 6:19-20:  “We have this hope, a sure and steadfast anchor of the soul, a hope that enters the inner shrine behind the curtain, where Jesus, a forerunner on our behalf, has entered, having become a high priest forever according to the order of Melchizedek.”

Winston Churchill (1874-1965) served the United Kingdom as Prime Minister from 1940-1945 and later from 1951-1955.  He unwavering leadership during World War II lifted the spirits of his nation in the darkest of times.  He was also a prolific writer with countless published works.

God’s Embrace

From Psalm 85:5-6:  “Will you be angry with us forever?  Will you prolong your anger to all generations?  Will you not revive us again, so that your people may rejoice in you?”

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Searching to find peace

Hidden by dark winds

Discomfort arrives

For mankind hath sinned

 

Touched by God’s embrace

Peace steps into light

Feeling His comfort

Grace washes flesh white

 

Praying to Father

Hope now reaches out

Finding peace at last

His Word carries clout

 

Steps walking in faith

God’s love shall not cease

Replacing darkness

Sharing endless peace

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From Luke 2:12-14:  “This will be a sign for you: you will find a child wrapped in bands of cloth and lying in a manger.  And suddenly there was with the angel a multitude of the heavenly host, praising God and saying, ‘Glory to God in the highest heaven, and on earth peace among those whom He favors!'”

Everyday Blessings (Elfchen Series #134)

New Day

Life’s

Inevitable waves

Cascading with doubt

Jesus refreshes us daily

Peace

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New Strength

Through

God’s grace

No longer filled

With darkness of weakness

Hope

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New Life

Christ’s

Always leading

Finding His redemption

Guided by mercy’s lighthouse

Love

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Looking Ahead

From the words of American-born philosopher, Pema Chadron:  “Be kinder to yourself, then let your kindness flood the world.”

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Waiting in life’s shadows, another year

Thinking conscious thoughts, ready to embrace

Setting aside more time for daydreaming

Leading to tomorrow’s energized space

 

Allowing positivity to shine

Sowing today’s seeds, filled with future hope

Reaping lasting harvest of inner peace

Looking ahead through New Year’s vivid scope

 

Finding humor’s lessons in life’s darkness

Focusing on single tasks, without more

Filling each day with heartfelt gifts of joy

Witnessing blessed year, coming ashore

 

Creating reservoirs of lasting light

Passing each on to others taking flight

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Advent’s Journey (Elfchen Series #131)

Prophetic

Trust

God’s promises

His actions awaken

Life’s wilderness shall blossom

Hope

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Witness

Hope

For Savior

God’s desires fulfilled

Bethlehem stable’s Holy ground

Peace

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Receive

Peace

Father’s gift

Lying in manger

Emmanuel, God with us

Joy

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Illuminating

Joy

Angels proclaim

Humble shepherds attest

Christ comes to save

Love

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Joy’s Game Changer (Third Sunday of Advent)

From Isaiah 35:10:  “And the ransomed of the Lord shall return and come to Zion with singing; everlasting joy shall be upon their heads; they shall obtain joy and gladness, and sorrow and sighing shall flee away.”

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Facing constant waves

Overwhelming despair

Father seeking to save

Eternal grace cares

 

Bethlehem manger

Looking beyond today

Savior, joy’s game changer

Mercy’s light conveys

 

Hope breathes, Son of Man

King of Kings, Prince of Peace

God opens His divine plan

Joy’s new centerpiece

 

Angels’ choir deploys

Always singing above

Reflections full of joy

Peace filling with love

 

Scaling highest slopes

Locating lasting peace

Rebuilding life’s new hope

Joy shall never cease

 

Peace restored, anew

Joy’s steady, beating drum

Tomorrow’s hope accrues

Salvation to come

 

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With lyrics composed by renowned English hymn writer, Issac Watts, “Joy to the World” has become the most published Christmas hymn in North America.  These verses were penned in 1719, and they share an interpretation from Psalm 98.  In this Advent season, the hymn holds a special place with its emphasis on the joy we have been patiently waiting for.

God with Us (Elfchen Series #130)

Renewing

God’s

Magnificent creation

Praising every sunrise

Worshipping His blessed peace

Sustaining

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Affirming 

God’s

Sustaining spirit

Sunset never closes

Reaching for tomorrow’s hope

Awakening

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Cleansing

God’s

Awakening message

Endless joy sings

Mercy delivers His love

Forgiving

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This series of poems (written in the German-inspired style of Elfchen or Elevenie) shares a total of eleven words in each poem, with a sequence by line of one, two, three, four, and one words.

Peace Yet to Come (Second Sunday of Advent)

From Micah 5:3-5:  “Therefore He shall give them up until the time when she who is in labor has brought forth; then the rest of His kindred shall return to the people of Israel.  And He shall stand and feed His flock in the strength of the Lord, in the majesty of the name of the Lord His God.  And they shall live secure, for now He shall be great to the ends of the earth, and He shall be the one of peace.”

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From root of Jesse

Rises spirit of man’s hope

Filling believers with peace

Climbing up faith’s slope

 

Called to one body

Newborn King shall share His peace

Extending bridges to God

Writing hope’s new lease

 

As children of God

Blessed be His peacemakers

Filled with Father’s righteous peace

Hope’s new groundbreakers

 

Future hope muffled

Reconciled through Father’s grace

Reclaiming merciful peace

Bethlehem’s birthplace

 

Hope’s light filled with peace

Easing burdens of others

Shattering sinful darkness

For every brother

 

Creation’s spirit

Promise of restoration

Foretaste of peace yet to come

Hope’s new foundation

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Another beloved Advent hymn is “What Child is This.”  The lyrics were crafted by English hymn writer and poet, William Chatterton Dix, in 1865.  In 1871, the tune of a traditional English song, “Greensleeves,” was added to the lyrics.  This hymn shares the spirit of peace, forever witnessed in the birth of Jesus Christ, our Savior.

Hope’s Homecoming (First Sunday of Advent)

From Isaiah 9:2:  “The people who walked in darkness have seen a great light; those who lived in a land of deep darkness—on them light has shined.”

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Awaiting salvation

Praying for His coming

Lord, Savior, Prince of Peace

Crowning hope’s homecoming

 

Seeking mercy’s refuge

Praying for faith to speak

Rock built with God’s goodness

Boosting hope, small and weak

 

Sharing God’s depth of love

Praying for grace-filled news

His assurance sows trust

Walking in hope’s new shoes

 

Inviting our wonder

Praying hearts, blessed with praise

Darkness fades, peace arrives

Lighting hope’s steadfast blaze

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One of Advent’s most enduring hymns is “O Come, O Come, Emmanuel”.  The original text was composed in Latin during the 12th century.  In 1861, English priest and scholar John Mason Neale translated the lyrics into what many Christian recognize and sing today.