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Do you enjoy writing or reading poetry?  Most of the posts on Big Sky Buckeye are filled with poetry, but I also share short stories, photography, and a few surprises along the way. You are invited to sit a spell and find something you like.  I enjoy sharing my curiosity through my writing.  You are welcome to like, comment, follow, share, or reblog a post.

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Greetings Big Sky Buckeye readers!  I am heading to my native state of Montana on Wednesday (January 19), and I will not return back to my home in Ohio for about a month.  My mother is recovering from surgery to repair a broken hip, and she needs help from my wife and I.  New posts will continue through Thursday.  While I am away, I will be turning off my comments until I return.  I appreciate everyone’s patience and please take care.

Each Tuesday shares another opportunity to post a series of short poems, which are written in the Japanese-inspired style of Haiku.  Each week the theme varies, and today’s revolves around how life allows us to manage “Stepping Forward.”

In addition to my writing, view another journal entry posted on January 18 in From My Journal.  While Big Sky Buckeye enjoys writing poetry and short stories, much of his journal writing is inspired from reading and commenting on other blogger’s posts.

You are invited to read a quote updated on January 18 from thoughts shared from the words of American writer and poet Madeleine L’EngleShe delivers a message filled with enjoying our maturing lives as well as making our listening a priority.

Here’s my Baker’s Dozen, featuring 13 of my recent writings from the past couple of weeks.  Each post is linked to take you right to its location.  Other poems, short stories, and feature writings can be found in the archives (found at the top of the page), which will be updated frequently with past selections.  Enjoy!

You Don’t Say!

Few people have heard of the famous naturalist and wildlife photographer William Xavier Knox.  His life has been one amazing adventure of finding the unexplored, the unexplained, and the unusual.  Billy’s dreams have become quite legendary.

A few winters ago, Billy survived a scrap with a polar snake up in the Great White North.  He had been hoping to finally capture a picture of the elusive Arctic snake crossing the frozen tundra.  Instead, he nearly fell to his death in a large crevice in the ice.  Fortunately for Billy, his pick axe held firmly while he pulled himself up to safety.

Emulating some of his shutterbug heroes, Billy harbors hopes of becoming a revered wildlife photographer.  With his treasured camera, he is still waiting to capture that “once in a lifetime” shot.

None of Billy’s photography has been published yet.  He relies on “word of mouth” to carry the message of his work.  After all, he figures this is the best approach because he doesn’t want people stampeding into nature’s quiet landscapes.

Unfortunately, few people have met up with Billy.  Even fewer people have ever heard of this almost forgotten wildlife photographer.  Nonetheless, he has huge plans for the future of his work.

A determined Billy is currently traveling across the eastern third of the “Cowboy State” of Wyoming.  The upper plateau and plains are home to many exotic animals. 

A freak of nature, this fearsome critter has never been captured on film.  A cross between a jack rabbit and an antelope has produced a mysterious creature called a Jackalope.  Unfortunately for Billy, someone else has successfully photographed this Jackalope a few days ago.  All Billy can say is, “Geez, another one got away!”

Billy’s next appointment takes him to the Pacific Northwest.  He plans to search the thick rainforests of the mountains for the elusive Pacific Northwest Tree Octopus.

As Billy arrives in the area, he is informed that a website already features his prized target.  When interviewed, Billy disappointedly explains, “Why am I always coming in second when trying to capture these prizes of nature?”

A young girl shows Billy the link to the website:  https://zapatopi.net/treeoctopus/

Winking at him and smiling, she smartly asks Billy, “Do you really believe in these odd species of nature?”

Billy pauses and thinks for a second or two before smiling back, “Well, if I didn’t, there goes my photography career.  Right down into my musty basement, filled with old photographs.”

Billy’s mind is beginning to stir to semi-consciousness.  A gloomy vision clouds his mind, and he begins to wrestle with it.

He is busy photographing school children across the country for those dreaded school portraits.  Someone adds, “You’ll know when he has reached your school.  Just look for his personalized license plate:  CRZYPCS.”

Waking up from his long, overnight nap, a sleepy-eyed Billy wanders out into the kitchen of his family’s Wyoming ranch house.  His grandfather is browsing a book, and he welcomes Billy to their usual morning time together. 

Grandfather asks, “How did you sleep young man?” 

“Just terrible!” replies Billy as he rubs his ten-year old eyes.  “I had a horrible dream about being a school photographer.  You know . . . the one who takes those awful photos for school yearbooks and student portrait packets to send home.”

His grandfather pauses and places the book on the table, “You don’t say!” 

Billy glances at the book, and he smiles up at the author of the book, William Xavier Knox.  His grandfather is a world-renowned wildlife photographer.

Defining Moments (Elfchen Series #69)

Endearing

Appreciate

Day’s treasures

Each precious minute

Fleeting moments pass by

Photographs

Photo by cottonbro on Pexels.com

Persevering

Freedom’s

Challenging task

Brick by brick

Renewing democracy’s fragile road

Courage

Photo by Javon Swaby on Pexels.com

Celebrating

Legendary

Life journey

Childhood’s early dreams

Maturing into life’s amazing

Accomplishments

Photo by Amina Filkins on Pexels.com

This series of poems (written in the German-inspired style of Elfchen or Elevenie) shares a total of eleven words in each poem, with a sequence by line of one, two, three, four, and one words.