Nature’s Living Spirit (Tanka Series #2)

Angry, stormy seas

Nature’s spirit at its worst

Fear of tomorrow

Across the horizon comes

Peace and love in a new light

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Darker and darker

Harshest words shouting through clouds

Louder and louder

Sunshine opening these skies

God’s rainbow showing His peace

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Nature’s harmony

Unbalanced and falling down

Lightning splitting peace

Sudden calmness comes to all

Rebuilding broken pieces

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A Tanka is a Japanese form of poetry, which is related to its cousin Haiku.  The poem uses 31 syllables covering five lines (with syllable counts following a 7, 5, 5, 7 and 7 sequence).  An effective Tanka uses personification, metaphors, and similes in its construction, and it performs well in expressing a mood, a thought, or a feeling.   

Oswald Chambers Quote

beautiful beauty blue bright

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Cleansing from sin is to the very heights and depths of our spirit if we will keep in the light as God is in the light, and the very Spirit that fed the life of Jesus Christ will feed the life of our spirits.

From 1 Thessalonians 5:23:  “May the God of peace Himself sanctify you entirely; and may your spirit and soul and body be kept sound and blameless at the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ.”

From Psalm 139:11-12:  “If I say, ‘Surely the darkness shall cover me, and the light around me become night,’ even the darkness is not dark to you; and the night is as bright as the day, for darkness is as light to you.”