Enduring Words

In the United States, the “Pledge of Allegiance” has been recited countless times in school classrooms, at the beginning of meetings, sporting events, and other instances.  The original 29 words were inspired by the writings of Francis Bellamy (from 1892) and became official in 1923.  In 1954, the words, “under God” were added.  These 31 words mean much more than just a mere collection of words.  

Photo by Jonathan Meyer on Pexels.com

I pledge allegiance

 

We the People, commit to stand

With loyalty across this land

 

To the flag

 

Stars and Stripes shall forever fly

Old Glory standing proud and high

 

Of the United States of America

 

Solidarity, stand as One

United, never be undone

 

And to the Republic

 

A more perfect Union shall spring

Shining democracy will ring

 

For which it stands

 

Tested, resilient, and upright

Faithful courage, nation’s birthright

 

One nation under God

 

Built upon God’s eternal love

Divine guidance comes from above

 

Indivisible

 

Inseparable and lasting

Forged by trial and fire’s casting

 

With liberty

 

Covering this land of the free

Freedom from sea to shining sea

 

And justice for all

 

Conquers inequities with care

Truth and righteousness come to bear 

 

Courtesy of Pinterest.

I have posted this video before, but it is worth a second look.  Here is American comedian, Red Skelton, sharing his interpretation of the words’ meaning in the “Pledge of Allegiance.”  

15 thoughts on “Enduring Words

  1. I actually heard that Red Skelton monologue on TV when he first recited it. That makes me ancient, doesn’t it? My dad LOVED the Red Skelton show. I thought it was weird the way he laughed at his own jokes, but that’s what Dad liked best. He’d giggle along with the comedian. This monologue was a real step away from his typical routine.

    Liked by 1 person

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