Trivia’s Facts and More (12/17)

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This informative post will be posted on Saturday along with my usual writing.  You are invited to participate with the opening question.

Brain Teaser Question

What letter would come next in this sequence?

M,  A,  M,  J,  J,  A,  S,  O,  ___

(answer found at the end of this post)

Featured Facts

James Monroe was the 5th American President (1817-1825).  He became the fourth Virginian to serve as President (George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, and James Madison being the first three). 

Here are a few interesting facts about this two-term President:

  • Occupations:  farmer, lawyer
  • Schooling:  attended College of William and Mary (Williamsburg, VA)
  • Previous political experience:  Governor of Virginia, Secretary of War, State

Two of the most significant accomplishments of the Monroe administration were the passage of the Missouri Compromise in 1820 and the establishment of the Monroe Doctrine.  The Missouri Compromise redefined the division line between slave and free states in the Union.  The Monroe Doctrine stated that no further European colonies would be allowed in the America’s while the United States would remain neutral in European affairs.

Answer to Brain Teaser Question

N–for November

Trivia’s Facts and More (10/29)

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This informative post will be posted on Saturday along with my usual writing.  You are invited to participate with the opening question.

Brain Teaser Question

Find the next letter in the sequence:    a    b    d    g    k    ?

(A) m    (B) n    (C) o    (D) p    (E) q

(answer found at the end of this post)

Featured Facts

The fourth President of the United States was James Madison (1809-1817).  He has often been referred to as “The Father of the Constitution.”

Born in the Virginia colony in 1751, Madison was destined to be a farmer and later a politician.  He would die at his home at Montpelier, Virginia in 1836.

Here are some interesting facts about Madison:

  • He was the shortest President, standing only 5′ 4″.
  • His portrait was used on the $5,000 bill, which was only issued during the American Civil War.
  • His spouse, Dolley, was instrumental in saving a portrait of George Washington when the British attempted to burn down the White House during the War of 1812.

During the ratification period of the Constitution in 1787-1788, James Madison was instrumental in writing numerous articles in support of it.  He was joined in this endeavor by Alexander Hamilton and John Jay.  These many writings were called the “Federalist Papers.”

Answer to Brain Teaser Question

(D) p

Between a and b, there are no letters

Between b and d, there is one letter:  c

Between d and g, there are two letters:  e   f

Between g and k, there are three letters:  h  i  j

To continue, skip four letters:  l   m   n   o

Trivia’s Facts and More (8/27)

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This informative post will be posted on Saturday along with my usual writing.  You are invited to participate with the opening question.

Brain Teaser Question

What day follows the day before yesterday if two days from now will be Sunday?

(answer found at the end of this post)

Featured Facts

Massachusetts’ own John Adams followed Virginian George Washington as President of the United States in 1797.  Despite being a one-term President, he served his country with distinction.

Because of his commitment to establishing and strengthening the country’s navy, Adams is sometimes referred to as the “Father of the Navy.”  He was the first President to live in the new Executive Mansion, later called the White House.  He was also the father of the sixth American President, John Quincy Adams.

His loving relationship with his wife, Abigail, has been well-researched from the many letters shared between the two of them.  Over 1,000 of these letters have been preserved.  Together, they witnessed many historical events in the formation of their young nation.

Adams death occurred on July 4, 1826, on the 50th anniversary of the Declaration of Independence.  His political rival, chief writer of the Declaration, and America’s third President, Thomas Jefferson, also died on the same day.

Gilbert Stuart’s official portrait of President Adams. (courtesy of Pinterest)

Answer to Brain Teaser Question

Thursday.  The key is to realize that “now” must be Friday.

Trivia’s Facts and More (8/20)

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This informative post will be posted on Saturday along with my usual writing.  You are invited to participate with the opening question.

Brain Teaser Question

What can run but never walks, has a mouth but never talks, has a head but never weeps, and has a bed but never sleeps?

(answer found at the end of this post)

Featured Facts

Many Americans know some facts about the first President of the United States, George Washington.  Here are a few to note.

Before becoming a soldier and military leader, he spent some of his younger years as a surveyor.  He was home schooled on the family plantation in Westmoreland County in the Colony of Virginia.  This was quite common for youth growing up in many of the southern colonies.

Here are some lesser known facts about “The Father of His Country.”  Prior to being elected President, Washington presided over the Constitutional Convention which crafted the iconic American Constitution, which is still used to this day.

Few people can remember which political party he was affiliated with during his time as President.  Washington was the only President to never be tied to a specific political party.

In his farewell address at the end of his second term in office, President Washington expressed his disdain for political parties.  He felt that the young country should function without them.  His words from this speech spoke with the following vision:

“[The spirit of party] serves always to distract the public councils and enfeeble the public administration.  It agitates the community with ill-founded jealousies and false alarms, kindles the animosity of one part against another, foments occasionally riot and insurrection.”

In 1796, Gilbert Stuart painted this life-size portrait of President Washington. (courtesy of Pinterest)

Answer to Brain Teaser Question

A river.

Mount Rushmore Presidents Quotes

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Mount Rushmore National Monument is located in South Dakota’s Black Hills.  The sculptured figures of George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt, and Abraham Lincoln stand watch.  

Abraham Lincoln (1961-1865)

The best thing about the future is that it comes one day at a time.

Theodore Roosevelt (1901-1909)

In any moment of decision, the best thing you can do is the right thing, the next best thing is the wrong thing, and the worst thing you can is nothing.

Mount Rushmore Presidents Quotes

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Mount Rushmore National Monument is located in South Dakota’s Black Hills.  The sculptured figures of George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt, and Abraham Lincoln stand watch.  

George Washington (1789-1797)

Happiness depends more upon the internal frame of a person’s own mind, than the externals in the world.

Thomas Jefferson (1801-1809)

The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants.

Mount Rushmore Presidents Quotes

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Mount Rushmore National Monument is located in South Dakota’s Black Hills.  The sculptured figures of George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt, and Abraham Lincoln stand watch.  

Abraham Lincoln (1861-1865)

Behind the cloud the sun is still shining.

Theodore Roosevelt (1901-1909)

This country will not be a good place for any of us to live unless we make it a good place for all of us to live in.

American Presidents Quotes

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Lyndon B. Johnson (1963-1969)

Until justice is blind to color, until education is unaware of race, until opportunity is unconcerned with the color of men’s skin, emancipation will be a proclamation but not a fact.

Richard M. Nixon (1969-1974)

Only if you have been in the deepest valley, can you ever know how magnificent it is to be on the highest mountain.

American Presidents Quotes

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Dwight D. Eisenhower (1953-1961)

We the people, elect leaders not to rule but to serve.

John F. Kennedy (1961-1963)

Let us not seek the Republican answer or the Democratic answer, but the right answer.  Let us not seek to fix the blame for the past.  Let us accept our own responsibility for the future.

American Presidents Quotes

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Franklin Delano Roosevelt (1933-1945)

We are a nation of many nationalities, many races, many religions–bound together by a single unity–the unity of freedom and equality.

Harry S Truman (1945-1953)

There is some risk involved in action, there always is.  But there is far more risk in failure to act.